fbpx

One Detroit: A Crisis of Race



One Detroit and American Black Journal

National Programs

PBS NewsHour Presents - Race Matters: America in Crisis



The Talk - Race in America

 

FRONTLINE: Policing the Police



The FRONTLINE Dispatch: Race, Police and the Pandemic


 

RESOURCES FOR PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS

Exploring Anti-Racism with Children

Sesame Street/CNN Town Hall – Standing Up To Racism

At-Home Learning

Help Students Understand the Relationship between the Police and the Military
Read the news summary, watch the video and answer the discussion questions. June 4th, 2020 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour. 

Protest and Politics
The stories from across America have been disturbing, with clashes between protestors and police.  Sadly, it’s not the first time protestors have raged against governments from democratic to autocratic–and in each case, the state raged back. This classroom resource provides background information about the Civil Rights movement in the U.S., the Vietnam War, societal shifts, the media, and events around the globe.

Civil Rights: Then and Now
This collection of videos, documents, and primary sources lends context to the events and leaders that defined the Civil Rights Movement’s first three decades (1954-1985). These resources also capture the issues and activists involved in the struggle today—those making headlines, stirring debate, and trending on social media.

The education staff at WXXI, a public media services company in Rochester, New York pulled together an extensive list of activities from PBS LearningMedia to support educators and families while discussing race. The list explores race, anti-racism, protests, civil rights, Black history, bias, and more.

 

Follow One Detroit

Follow One Detroit on Facebook  Follow One Detroit on Twitter  Follow One Detroit on Instagram  Follow One Detroit on YouTube  Sign-up for the One Detroit newsletter

News From Around Detroit

National Headlines

  • Millions of tenants at risk as federal eviction ban ends

    The federal ban on evictions is set to expire tonight. A last-minute effort by House Dems to extend the moratorium failed late yesterday, and the Supreme Court ruled that the moratorium could not be extended without new legislation from Congress. A Census survey found that as of July 5, roughly 3.6 million people are at risk of eviction in the next two months. Emily Benfer, visiting professor of law and public health at Wake Forest University, joins.

  • Minorities struggle for headway in the legal weed business

    In 2016, Massachusetts voters approved an initiative that required the state to create policies that would bring those disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs into the new legal cannabis industry. Today, minority-owned businesses make up only a small fraction of the hundreds of marijuana dispensaries in the state. Special Correspondent Kira Kay reports on why equity candidates are struggling in the legal weed industry.

  • California wildfire flares but within line crews have built

    The fire northeast of the town of Paradise, which was largely destroyed in 2018 by the nation's deadliest wildfire in a century, has been burning since July 13 and is more than 20% contained.