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Category: Racial disparity

Maternal mortality rates rising in Michigan, disproportionally impacting Black mothers

Michigan has experienced a rise in maternal deaths as highlighted in an in-depth report by Detroit News. Of particular concern is the disproportionate impact on women of color. Dawn Shanafelt, Director of the Division of Maternal & Infant Health in the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services, discusses the disparities among women of color, how to address the problem and more.

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Michigan Roundtable for Diversity & Inclusion names new co-executive director, announces name change

The Michigan Roundtable for Diversity & Inclusion has announced longtime community organizer and author Yusef Bunchy Shakur as the nonprofit’s new co-executive director. The nonprofit also plans to change its name to the Michigan Roundtable for Just Communities to better reflect the nonprofit’s mission. Host Stephen Henderson talks with Shakur about his new appointment and the name change.

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Stigma, shortage of psychiatrists further exacerbates mental health disparities in the Black community

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and “American Black Journal” examines the unique challenges the Black community faces in navigating mental health issues. Carlynn Nichols, senior director of behavioral health at CNS Healthcare, talks about the mental health challenges facing children, individuals and families today and a growing shortage of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals.

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Detroit symposium aims to tackle health disparities facing Black men

The Wayne State University School of Medicine, the Wayne Mobile Health Unit and community stakeholders host a symposium on Black men’s health. Scheduled for April 13 at Hartford Memorial Baptist Church in Detroit, the “Brother, Let’s Talk: A Conversation on Black Men’s Health” symposium aims to shed light on the disparities and health challenges faced by Black men.

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New data released by EHproject shows Black women are at higher risk for heart disease

New data from the medical team at EHproject show African American women are at a greater risk for heart disease than their white counterparts. For American Heart Month, Henry Ford Health Cardiologist Dr. Brittany Fuller talks about the high rate of heart disease among Black women. Plus, she provides some helpful advice on what women can do to reduce their risk factors.

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United Way for Southeastern Michigan awards latest round of Racial Equity Fund grants

United Way for Southeastern Michigan (UWSEM) President & CEO Dr. Darienne Hudson shares details with guest host Trudy Gallant-Stokes about the latest round of Racial Equity Fund recipients. The grants total $1 million and were awarded to BIPOC-led nonprofit organizations to help them address racial inequities in the region. Plus, they talk about the expansion of the fund into Washtenaw County.

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Detroit’s State of the Hood summit brings civic, community leaders together to talk about gun violence

Detroit’s State of the Hood summit returned this year to talk about solutions for stopping gun violence. Producer Marcus Green takes viewers to the 2022 summit to hear what religious, civic and community leaders have to say about gun violence in Detroit. Plus, summit participants explore the current resources and investments needed to stop gun violence involving inner city neighborhood youth.

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Black Midwest Symposium in Detroit Focuses on Unique Midwest Challenges, Solutions

The second biennial Black Midwest Symposium convenes in Detroit, exploring the unique challenges of African Americans in the Midwest and Rust Belt. Host Stephen Henderson talks with Marquis Taylor, one of the event’s planning committee members, to learn more about the goal of the Oct. 20-22, 2022 symposium, this year’s theme— Presence and Protest, and the notable speakers participating.

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Making Black Detroit: The importance of The Divine Nine, Black greek letter organizations

Detroit Public Television and WDET-FM host the “Making Black Detroit” Town Hall. The LEE Group’s President & CEO Mark S. Lee moderates a discussion with The Divine Nine fraternities and sororities about the history, contributions and future of the Black Greek Letter Organizations in Detroit. The town hall was hosted in part with PBS’ “Making Black America” documentary.

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Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s “Making Black America” documentary tells the story of African American resilience, empowerment

“American Black Journal” previews a new PBS documentary series, “Making Black America: Through the Grapevine” by noted historian and storyteller Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., focused on the vast social networks, associations and organizations created by and for African Americans as a means of empowerment in the face of racism. Host Stephen Henderson talks with producer and director, Stacey Holman.

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IS/LAND Premieres ‘Invisible Embrace’ Inspired by Japanese Internment Camp Survivors’ Stories

An archive of oral history interviews with Japanese internment camp survivors has inspired Detroit Asian American artists collective IS/LAND to create “Invisible Embrace,” a performance that provides audiences a space and experience to share, learn and reflect on the experiences of Japanese internment camp survivors. One Detroit Arts & Culture producer Sarah Smith talks with IS/LAND’s Amber Kao.

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Rise of Anti-Asian Hate Revives Asian American Civil Rights Movement Sparked by Vincent Chin’s Murder

Nearly 40 years after the racially motivated murder of Chinese American Vincent Chin in Detroit, the hate crime is being seen in a new light alongside a more recent rise in anti-Asian hate across the country; one that looks similar to Chin’s case, but some experts say is much worse. One Detroit’s Bill Kubota explores how Vincent Chin’s legacy shaped Asian American civil rights activists today.

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Racially Motivated Buffalo Grocery Store Shooting Kills 10, Injures Three

As the African American community is gripped by another tragic mass shooting, Detroit Branch NAACP President Rev. Wendell Anthony joins “American Black Journal” host Stephen Henderson to talk about the Buffalo shooting and the gunman’s white supremacist views. Plus, they posit what needs to be done to reduce and eliminate these casualties, including white Americans’ role in addressing racism. 

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Drowning in Dues: The Cost of Water for Communities of Color

“American Black Journal” host Stephen Henderson talks with We the People of Detroit Co-founder Cecily McClellan and Wayne State University Law Professor Peter Hammer about the rising cost of water in Detroit, looming water shutoffs, and the racial disparities impacting access to clean, safe and affordable drinking water. 

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Mental Health Awareness Month highlights disparities and stigma in the Black community

For National Mental Health Awareness Month, host Stephen Henderson talks with Eric Doeh, President & CEO of Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network (DWIHN), about the pandemic’s impact on mental health, the stigma of mental illness in the Black community, economic barriers and health disparities affecting minorities, and access to mental healthcare services. 

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City of Detroit, Community Partners Announce Four-Day Event to Commemorate 40th Anniversary of Vincent Chin Murder

One Detroit’s Bill Kubota takes viewers to Detroit’s former Chinatown on Cass Avenue for an announcement from the City of Detroit, Detroit Public Television and other community partners about the four-day Vincent Chin 40th Remembrance & Rededication. Leaders recount the tragic history of Vincent Chin’s murder and the importance of the event as the AAPI community continues to fight for equality.

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Comic Book Historian Ken Quattro’s Journey to Writing ‘Invisible Men’

One Detroit’s Will Glover sat down with Ken Quattro for a conversation about his book “Invisible Men: The Trailblazing Black Artists of Comic Books,” which takes a candid look at the history of the comic book industry and the racial disparity embedded into its story. “Invisible Men,” Quattro says, tell the story of the human experience and the resilience of the human spirit.

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Future of Work | Have Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Progressed in the Workplace?

One Detroit contributor and American Black Journal host Stephen Henderson checks in with marketing consultant Mark S. Lee, president of The Lee Group, MI LLC, on where diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) are in the workplace. They explore the progress that’s been made in regards to DEI efforts and what’s still lacking nearly two years after the topic re-emerged into the mainstream, after George Floyd’s death.

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2/10/22: One Detroit – Critical Race Theory, Michigan Childcare, Workplace DEI, Bill Bonds

One Detroit’s Bill Kubota meets with Detroit artist Jonathan Harris to talk about his viral painting ‘Critical Race Theory’ and the conversations its sparking across the globe. Then, One Detroit’s Will Glover connects with BridgeDetroit reporter Nushrat Rahman to discuss the high childcare costs in Michigan and the financial assistance available to families. Plus, learn how diversity, equity and inclusion have progressed in the workplace since the death of George Floyd and remember the late newsman Bill Bonds, who would have turned 90 years old this month.

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American Black Journal, BridgeDetroit Host Virtual Town Hall on Reparations

American Black Journal and BridgeDetroit are teaming up to host a virtual town hall at 12 p.m. Feb. 16 about reparations for Black Americans. Join us as we take a detailed look at the history of reparations and discuss what Detroit’s new task force means for the idea. The esteemed panelists will share insights on the initial work being done on the ground floor in Detroit and more in a conversation moderated by American Black Journal host Stephen Henderson.

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BridgeDetroit | Detroit Church Hopes to Boost Worker-Owned Businesses in Latino Community

At Grace in Action, the co-op movement started roughly 20 years ago when Mexican Industries, a Southwest Detroit-based auto parts maker, abruptly closed after workers voted to form a union. Nine hundred mostly Latino workers were laid off, and the economic impact on the community was immediate. That led Meghan Sobocienski, executive director of Grace in Action, to actively create new business models for immigrant workers in the community. She’s been thinking about employment and the future of work since then, and to her, it comes down to one simple idea: create worker-led, locally owned businesses.

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Study Shows Black Drivers Were Stopped by Michigan State Police at Disproportionately High Rates 

American Black Journal host Stephen Henderson examines the results of an independent study from the Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice showing African Americans were stopped by Michigan State Police troopers at disproportionately high rates in 2020. He sits down with Michigan State Police Director Col. Joe Gasper and Michigan Department of Civil Rights Executive Director John E. Johnson, Jr. to investigate the findings and the steps being taken to address these racial disparities.

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2/01/22: American Black Journal – Racial Disparity in Traffic Stops, Legacy of Dr. Charles H. Wright

This week, host Stephen Henderson investigates an independent study from MSU’s School of Criminal Justice that showed Black drivers were stopped by Michigan State Police at disproportionately high rates in 2020. Stephen examines the steps being taken to address these racial disparities. Plus, BridgeDetroit’s Engagement Director Orlando Bailey takes us inside the life and legacy of the late Dr. Charles H. Wright, founder of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, with the museum’s Director of Design and Fabrication Kevin Davidson.

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1/31/22: One Detroit – Deidre D.S. Sense, Asbury Park Film, DSO In-Person, Amaryn Olmeda

One Detroit’s Will Glover talks to veteran Detroit hip-hop artist Deidre D.S. Sense about her latest album and quarantine concert series. Contributor Stephen Henderson talks with filmmaker Ken “Legend” Williams about the impact of his new film, ‘Asbury Park.’ One Detroit’s Christy McDonald talks with Erik Ronmark of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra about the orchestra’s plan to welcome audiences in-person again. And violinist Amaryn Olmeda performs Mozart’s ‘Concerto for Violin No. 3’ 

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1/20/22: One Detroit – Detroit’s Diverse History

This week, One Detroit examines the diverse history of Michigan’s largest city, Detroit. Learn more about the storied history of the city’s boxing scene, and what makes Detroit boxers knockouts in the ring. Then, One Detroit’s Bill Kubota visits the historic Birwood Wall, a Detroit wall with a racist past, and explores how it offers hope and healing today. Plus, a look into Detroit’s highways and the damage they’ve caused to Black communities over the years.

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Northwest Detroit Development Named After Artist Tylonn Sawyer 

A new mixed-use development project coming to Northwest Detroit will be named in honor of a local artist some Detroiters might know. The project will be named Sawyer Art Apartments in honor of Detroit contemporary artist Tylonn Sawyer. One Detroit’s Will glover sat down with Tylonn to discuss the development’s name, how digital media may help or hurt Black artists, and what it’s like to address racism in America through a Black artist’s eyes.

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1/11/22: American Black Journal – Black Leaders Detroit, Workplace DEI, Dance Theatre of Harlem

Host Stephen Henderson talks with Black Leaders Detroit Founder Dwan Dandridge about leveling the playing field for Black-owned businesses and organizations through financial support. Then, Stephen discusses what progress has been made to workplace diversity and what areas are still lacking with marketing consultant Mark S. Lee. Plus, the Dance Theatre of Harlem makes a visit to the Motown Museum in Detroit before the upcoming premiere performance of “Higher Ground.”

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‘Who Killed Vincent Chin?’ Inducted into Library of Congress’ National Film Registry

The Detroit Public Television-produced 1987 documentary “Who Killed Vincent Chin?” received the ultimate honor this week when it was inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry and named one of the 25 most influential films this year. The documentary focuses on the brutal murder of 27-year-old Detroiter Vincent Chin in 1982, and the galvanizing effects it had to springboard the Asian American community into political action.

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BridgeDetroit | Uncovering Sarah Elizabeth Ray, ‘Detroit’s Other Rosa Parks’

Every Black Detroiter who spent summers on the nostalgic Boblo island giggling on the carousel or swinging in the dance hall should thank Sarah Elizabeth Ray. After being denied a seat on one of the segregated Boblo boat in 1945 because she was Black, she fought all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and won. Her case paved the way for the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which ruled segregation in public schools as unconstitutional.

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Making Mental Health Better for Communities of Color

Host Stephen Henderson talks with CNS Healthcare President and CEO Michael Garrett about how people can take care of their mental health this holiday season. Plus, Garrett shines a light on the Oxford High School shooting and the impact on students, parents, teachers and community members’  mental health.

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BridgeDetroit | Why Detroit Gun Owners Choose to Carry

In this country’s origin story, Black Americans were largely restricted from owning guns. Yet, in Detroit today, citizens are increasingly turning to gun ownership for a sense of protection and — sometimes — because of a constitutional right to carry. Residents have become self-reliant and are looking to arm others with gun safety lessons and information about the responsibility of ownership.

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Facing Inequities

Thanks to a grant from the Kresge Foundation, The Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion is expanding its anti-racism work in the city of Detroit.

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Do Black Lives Matter in America?

In an ongoing collaboration, American Black Journal and BridgeDetroit present a series of reports on issues threatening the lives of people of color and the groups advocating to protect them.

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Seven Last Words of the Unarmed

University of Michigan’s Director of Choirs, Dr. Eugene Rogers, sits down with Aaron Dworkin of Arts Engines for a conversation about the powerful choral work that pays tribute to African American men killed by police or other authority figures.

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WATCH NOW – Racism: The Real Public Health Crisis

Systemic racism has led to lead poisoning, air pollution and other factors risking the health of people of color. A recent virtual event focused on this crucial issue, featuring a presentation by Dr. Michelle Williams, dean of Harvard’s School of Public Health.

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Sundown towns: Then and now

One Detroit talked with BridgeDetroit’s Bryce Huffman, about his recent report on how many Detroit suburbs are wrestling with their legacy of being sundown towns that carried out anti-black policies.

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Policing, the community & schools

Stephen Henderson talked with Misha Stallworth, Detroit Public Schools board member, and Sherry McRill, President and CEO of Northeast Integrated Health, about strategies to support the police and the public.

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