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Category: PBS Books

AAPI Coverage from Across Southeast Michigan  

As the United States continues its battle against COVID-19 pandemic, it is also battling other social pandemics including a rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. The nonprofit organization Stop AAPI Hate has reported over 10,000 hate incidents over the past year. One Detroit has been covering the responses and stories of the Asian American and Pacific Islander community in Southeast Michigan. You can find more of our local coverage below as well as links to our joint storytelling project, AAPI Story Series, with WDET.

  The Story Behind Our AAPI Story Series

 

AAPI STORY SERIES: 

AAPI Story Series

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AAPI COVERAGE: 

AAPI News Coverage

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IS/LAND Premieres ‘Invisible Embrace’ Inspired by Japanese Internment Camp Survivors’ Stories

An archive of oral history interviews with Japanese internment camp survivors has inspired Detroit Asian American artists collective IS/LAND to create "Invisible Embrace," a performance that provides audiences a space and experience to share, learn and reflect on the experiences of Japanese internment camp survivors. One Detroit Arts & Culture producer Sarah Smith talks with IS/LAND's Amber Kao.

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News From Around Detroit

National Headlines

  • Super typhoon strikes Philippines with ferocious winds, forcing evacuations

    A powerful typhoon slammed into the northeastern Philippines on Sunday and was barreling across the main Luzon island toward the capital in a densely populated path where thousands have been evacuated to safety.

  • North Korea test-fired a missile toward the sea, South Korea says

    North Korea fired a short-range ballistic missile Sunday toward its eastern seas, extending a provocative streak in weapons testing as a U.S. aircraft carrier visits South Korea for joint military exercises in response to the North's growing nuclear threat.

  • In Jackson, the tap water is back, but the crisis remains

    JACKSON, Miss. -- In mid-September, Howard Sanders bumped down pothole-ridden streets in a white Cadillac weighed down with water bottles on his way to a home in Ward 3, a neglected neighborhood that he called "a war zone." Sanders, director of marketing and outreach for Central Mississippi Health Services, was then greeted at the door by Johnnie Jones. Since Jones' hip surgery about a month ago, the 74-year-old had used a walker to get around...

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